Search Results for “Scott Shane”


July 19, 2019
Scott Shane / New York Times

Scott Shane / New York Times  
Former Contractor Harold T. Martin III Sentenced to Nine Years for Amassing a Trove of Highly Classified NSA Documents

Troubled former National Security Agency contractor Harold T. Martin III,  has been sentenced to nine years for amassing a trove of highly classified NSA documents at his home in Glen Burnie, Maryland. Reported by his attorney to have autism spectrum disorder which led to a kind of hoarding of the documents, Martin had once been suspected of passing secrets on to foreign countries or being the source of the infamous Shadow Brokers leak of NSA hacking tools, but prosecutors ultimately came to believe he was not behind any malicious leaks.

Related: Cyberscoop, Fifth Domain | Cyber, ZDNet, CERT-EU , The Register – Security, Yahoo! News, DataBreaches.net, Washington Examiner, News : NPRSecurityWeek


June 4, 2019
The Daily / New York Times

The Daily / New York Times  
How a Secret U.S. Cyberweapon Backfired

A criminal group has held computer systems for the city of Baltimore hostage for nearly a month — paralyzing everything from email to the real estate market to the payment of water bills. But what residents don’t know is that a major component of the malware used to shut down the system was developed nearby by a federal government agency. Scott Shane, who covers national security and the U.S. intelligence community for The New York Times, talks about the situation.

May 25, 2019
Nicole Perlroth and Scott Shane / New York Times

Nicole Perlroth and Scott Shane / New York Times  
EternalBlue Exploit Developed by NSA Is a Key Component in Ransomware That Has Crippled Baltimore’s Government Systems, Report

A key component of the malware that cybercriminals used in the ransomware attack on Baltimore municipal systems, which has crippled the city government for three weeks now, is EternalBlue, a sophisticated exploit developed by the NSA’s elite Equation Group and exposed by agents known as the ShadowBrokers, according to security experts briefed on the case. EternalBlue was also a factor in earlier attacks in Texas and Pennsylvania, sources say. Experts say the damage in Baltimore is far more extensive than it would have been without the EternalBlue component because the cyberweapon exploits a vulnerability in unpatched Microsoft software that allows hackers to spread their malware faster and farther than they otherwise could. While state hackers from Russia, North Korea, and China have deployed EternalBlue in their attacks since its exposure in 2017, most notably in the notorious WannyCry ransomware worm, the NSA has not accepted responsibility for it or even answered the most basic questions related to it.

June 1, 2019
Scott Shane and Nicole Perlroth / New York Times

Scott Shane and Nicole Perlroth / New York Times  
Rep. Ruppersberger From Maryland Said NSA Denies One of Its Exploits, EternalBlue, Was Used in Baltimore Ransomware Attack

A Democratic U.S. congressman from Maryland, Representative C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, said that the National Security Agency (NSA) had denied that one of its hacking tools, stolen in 2017, was used in a ransomware attack on Baltimore’s government that had disrupted city services for more than three weeks. The newspaper had been told that by people directly involved in the investigation in Baltimore that the N.S.A. tool, EternalBlue, was found in the city’s network by all four contractors hired to study the attack and restore computer services. Ruppersberger said that senior leaders of NSA told him that “there is no evidence at this time that EternalBlue played a role in the ransomware attack affecting Baltimore City.” He also said the NSA exploit “was not used to gain access nor to propagate further activity within the network.”

Related: New York Times, Baltimore Sun, Panda SecurityStateScoop, Hackaday, DataBreachToday.com, Security Ledger, Malwarebytes Unpacked,

Tweets: @ScottShaneNYT