Search Results for “Natasha Lomas”


August 15, 2019
Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch

Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch  
WebKit Publishes New Tracking Prevention Policy That Cracks Down on Malicious Web Tracking Practices, Clamps Down on Those Who Violate It

WebKit, the open-source engine that underpins Internet browsers including Apple’s Safari browser, published its new tracking prevention policy, that spells out the web tracking practices that WebKit believes, as a matter of policy, should be prevented by default by web browsers because they infringe on a user’s privacy without giving users the ability to identify, understand, consent to, or control them. Technologies such as tracking pixels, browser and device fingerprinting and navigational tracking, among others, are deployed by an unregulated digital adtech industry and can be used to violate users’ privacy as well as serve as vehicles for injecting malware. WebKit also said it’s going to treat attempts to circumvent its policy as akin to malicious hack attacks to be responded to in kind; i.e. with privacy patches and fresh technical measures to prevent tracking.

May 22, 2019
Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch

Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch  
Transport London Will Start Tracking Wi-Fi Devices in July on the London Underground, Commuters Who Don’t Want to Be Tracked Will Be Forced to Turn Off Wi-Fi or Their Phones or Place Devices in Airplane Mode

The integrated body responsible for London’s transport system, Transport London (TfL), will roll out default Wi-Fi device tracking on the London Underground this summer, following a trial in 2016. TfL says that “secure, privacy-protected data collection will begin on July 8.” TfL will also offer alerts and says it could incorporate crowding data into its free open-data API to allow app developers, academics and businesses to expand the utility of the data by using it in their own products and services. Commuters using the Underground who do not wish to be tracked will have to turn off their Wi-Fi or phones or put their devices in airplane mode when using the transport. It’s not clear if TfL will encrypt the location data gathered from devices that authenticate to use the free Wi-Fi at the 260 or Wi-Fi-enabled London Underground stations. However, a genuine MAC address will be collected for each device, which TfL says will be depersonalized (pseudonymized) and encrypted to prevent the identification of the original MAC address and associated device. TfL contends it will not collect any other data from the devices.

June 12, 2019
Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch

Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch  
Football Division La Liga Fined $280,000 by Spain’s Data Protection Watchdog for Using Microphones, GPS of Fans’ Phones to Record Their Surroundings

Spanish football’s premier league division, La Liga, has been ordered by Spain’s data protection watchdog, the AEPD, to pay a €250,000 (around $280,000) fine for privacy violations of Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) related to its official app. The fine stems from the finding that La Liga was using the microphone and GPS of fans’ phones to record their surroundings in an effort to identify bars which are unofficially streaming games instead of paying for broadcasting rights. The app was ostensibly designed to allow users to receive minute-by-minute commentary of football matches. AEPD concluded that La Liga failed to be adequately clear about how the app recorded audio, violating Article 5.1 of the GDPR, which requires that personal data be processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner.

June 29, 2019
Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch

Natasha Lomas / TechCrunch  
Italy’s Data Protection Watchdog Issues $1.1 Million Fine Against Facebook for Violating Over 200,000 Italian Users’ Privacy in Cambridge Analytica Scandal

Italy’s data protection authority (DPA) has issued Facebook with a €1 million (around $1.1 million) fine for violations of local privacy law attached to the Cambridge Analytica data misuse scandal, the largest fine issued thus far in that case. The watchdog said that says 57 Italian Facebook users downloaded Dr. Aleksandr Kogan‘s Thisisyourdigitallife quiz app, the vehicle used to siphon data without users’ permission, with an additional 214,077 Italian users’ also having their personal information processed without their consent because they were friends of those users. The Italian DPA’s fine follows a previous £500,000 (around $635,000) sanction by the British privacy watchdog, which also found that the tech giant had not sufficiently protected users’ online data.