Search Results for “Kate OKeeffe”


June 26, 2019
Kate O’Keeffe and Dustin Volz / Wall Street Journal

Kate O’Keeffe and Dustin Volz / Wall Street Journal  
Huawei’s Gear Has Far More Exploitable Flaws Than That of Its Rivals, Half of Firmware Images in Enterprise Networks Devices Contain at Least One Exploitable Vulnerability, Report

Extensive cybersecurity flaws found in controversial Chinese telecom tech giant Huawei’s gear and a pattern of poor security decisions purportedly made by the firm’s engineers were found by researchers at cybersecurity firm Finite State. The researchers found that over half of the nearly 10,000 firmware images encoded into more than 500 variations of Huawei enterprise network-equipment devices tested contained at least one exploitable vulnerability, far higher than the average number of flaws found in devices manufactured by Huawei’s rivals Arista Networks and Juniper Networks. In one instance, Huawei’s network switch registered a 91% risk percentile for the number of credentials with hard-coded default passwords compared against all of Finite State’s entire firmware data set. White House officials who reviewed the Finite State report said the findings revealed flagrant violations of standard protocols such as using hardcoded user names and passwords encoded into firmware.

May 25, 2019
Chuin-Wei Yap, Dan Strumpf, Dustin Volz, Kate O’Keeffe and Aruna Viswanatha / Wall Street Journal

Chuin-Wei Yap, Dan Strumpf, Dustin Volz, Kate O’Keeffe and Aruna Viswanatha / Wall Street Journal  
Huawei Reportedly Scrutinized Hardware of Rivals in Spy-Proof Chambers Off Limits to U.S. Employees Sparking Fears of Chinese State Collaboration Among Intelligence Officials

A host of intellectual property theft lawsuits and allegations surround the business of controversial Chinese telecom and tech giant Huawei’s business, from the science behind 5G signals to the music in Huawei’s smartphones to the text in user manuals to technology that supports artificial-intelligence applications. According to sources, Huawei reportedly scrutinized the hardware of its rivals in spy-proof electronically secured rooms in Texas and elsewhere around the United States that were off limits to American employees, leading intelligence officials to believe Huawei was handling information more like a state intelligence service, with regimented tiers of secrecy, while relying on a protected communications channel with Beijing. The potential riches U.S. companies could make off of Huawei’s cheaper technology persuaded many U.S. business executives doing deals with Huawei to forgo making official complaints about commercial secrets theft even as they privately sought help from U.S. officials.