Search Results for “Dan Strumpf”


June 10, 2019
Dan Strumpf / Wall Street Journal

Dan Strumpf / Wall Street Journal  
OMB Acting Director Seeks Delay in Huawei Product Ban for Federal Contractors, Loan and Grant Recipients, Particularly Companies in Rural Areas

The White House’s acting director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Russell T. Vought is seeking to delay implementation of portions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that restrict the U.S. government’s business with Chinese telecom and tech giant Huawei Technologies citing the burdens on U.S. companies that use its technology, according to a June 4  letter from Vought to Vice President Mike Pence and nine members of Congress. The U.S. implemented the restrictions out of fear that Huawei is working with the Chinese government to build spying technology into its products. Vought’s letter says the NDAA rules could lead to a “dramatic reduction” in the number of companies that would be able to supply the government, and would disproportionately affect U.S. companies in rural areas, where Huawei gear is popular, that rely on federal grants. The letter asks for the restrictions on contractors and on federal loan and grant recipients to take effect four years from the law’s passage, instead of the current two years, to give affected companies time to respond and give feedback.

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May 25, 2019
Chuin-Wei Yap, Dan Strumpf, Dustin Volz, Kate O’Keeffe and Aruna Viswanatha / Wall Street Journal

Chuin-Wei Yap, Dan Strumpf, Dustin Volz, Kate O’Keeffe and Aruna Viswanatha / Wall Street Journal  
Huawei Reportedly Scrutinized Hardware of Rivals in Spy-Proof Chambers Off Limits to U.S. Employees Sparking Fears of Chinese State Collaboration Among Intelligence Officials

A host of intellectual property theft lawsuits and allegations surround the business of controversial Chinese telecom and tech giant Huawei’s business, from the science behind 5G signals to the music in Huawei’s smartphones to the text in user manuals to technology that supports artificial-intelligence applications. According to sources, Huawei reportedly scrutinized the hardware of its rivals in spy-proof electronically secured rooms in Texas and elsewhere around the United States that were off limits to American employees, leading intelligence officials to believe Huawei was handling information more like a state intelligence service, with regimented tiers of secrecy, while relying on a protected communications channel with Beijing. The potential riches U.S. companies could make off of Huawei’s cheaper technology persuaded many U.S. business executives doing deals with Huawei to forgo making official complaints about commercial secrets theft even as they privately sought help from U.S. officials.