Search Results for “Cleveland”


April 28, 2019
Robert Higgs / Cleveland.com

Robert Higgs / Cleveland.com  
Cleveland’s Flight and Baggage Information Boards Shuttered for At Least Five Days Due to Malware

The city of Cleveland acknowledged that malware caused a malfunction of the computer system for the flight and baggage information boards and email system of Cleveland Hopkins International airport, a malfunction that began on April 21 and continued through at least April 26. The mayor’s office issued a statement saying that although malware was found, no “hacking” had occurred and that the malware was not, despite numerous reports, ransomware.

February 26, 2020
Joe Tidy / BBC News

Joe Tidy / BBC News  
Ransomware Attack Slams Redcar and Cleveland Council Jurisdiction in the UK, Systems Have Been Shuttered for Almost Three Weeks

Network and computer systems at the jurisdiction of Redcar and Cleveland Council in the UK have been down for almost three weeks after getting hit with a ransomware attack on February 8. It took 19 days for the Council to admit it had been attacked, and the latest statement from the Council doesn’t indicate if it is negotiating with the attackers. The Council did say it is building a new server and websites, suggesting that it probably has no plans to pay the attackers.

February 15, 2020
Joe Tidy / BBC News

Joe Tidy / BBC News  
Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council in Northeast England Has Been Knocked Offline for a Week Following Cyberattack, Most Likely Ransomware Infection

The Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, a jurisdiction in the northeast of England, was hit with a cyberattack, most likely a ransomware attack, last Saturday, leaving more than 135,000 residents without online public services for nearly a week. Online appointment bookings, planning documents, social care advice, and council housing complaints systems are some of the services knocked offline. A team from the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has been on site since the cyber-attack hit.

April 30, 2019
Kaylee Remington / Cleveland.com

Kaylee Remington / Cleveland.com  
Catholic Parish in Ohio Swindled Out of $1.75 Million in Business Email Compromise Scam

The FBI confirmed that St. Ambrose Catholic Parish in Brunswick, Ohio lost $1.75 million through an email scam whose origin was a compromised business email. The church sent a letter to parishioners on Saturday acknowledge the business email compromise scam (BEC) in which attackers used a spearphishing email to pay the scammers $1.75 million that was owed to local contractors Marous Brothers Construction. The perpetrator had fooled the church into believing that Marous Brothers had changed their bank accounts.

July 22, 2016
ISSIE LAPOWSKY / Wired

ISSIE LAPOWSKY / Wired  
Experiment at RNC Convention Shows People Will Connect to Risky Open Wi-Fi

An experiment by security firm Avast that entailed setting up open, and insecure, Wi-Fi networks at various locations around Quicken Loans Arena and at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport during the Republican National Convention showed that 1,200 people signed on to the risky networks and 68.3% exposed their identities.

October 21, 2016
Darrell Etherington / TechCrunch

Darrell Etherington / TechCrunch  
Massive Internet Site Outage Due to DDoS Attacks on DNS Provider Dyn Inc.

A massive DDoS attack against DNS provider Dyn Inc brought down many popular Internet sites including Twitter, Reddit, Spotify, Esty, Box, Wix Customer Sites, Squarespace Customer Sites, Zoho CRM, Iheart.com (iHeartRadio), Github, The Verge, Cleveland.com, hbonow.com, PayPal, Big cartel, Wired.com, People.com, Urbandictionary.com, Basecamp, ActBlue, Zendesk.com, Intercom, Twillo, Pinterest, Grubhub, Okta, Starbucks rewards/gift cards, Storify.com, CNN. According to Dyn, the attack mostly affected users on the U.S. east coast and they mitigated the issue within a few hours.

August 23, 2019
WNYC Studios / Radiolab

WNYC Studios / Radiolab  
Right to be Forgotten

In Cleveland, Ohio, a group of journalists are trying out an experiment that has the potential to turn things upside down: they are unpublishing content they’ve already published. Photographs, names, entire articles. Every month or so, they get together to decide what content stays, and what content goes. On today’s episode, reporter Molly Webster goes inside the room where the decisions are being made, listening case-by-case as editors decide who, or what, gets to be deleted. It’s a story about time and memory; mistakes and second chances; and society as we know it.