Search Results for “Christopher Bing”


August 26, 2019
Christopher Bing / Reuters

Christopher Bing / Reuters  
CISA Fears Election Databases and Systems Could Be Targeted by Ransomware Ahead of 2020 Elections, Will Launch Program to Help Protect Them

Based on fears that election databases could be targeted by ransomware ahead of the 2020 elections, the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), plans to launch a program in about a month that narrowly focuses on protecting voter registration databases and systems ahead of the 2020 presidential election. The systems CISA seeks to protect are widely used to validate the eligibility of voters before they cast ballots, and were compromised in 2016 by Russian hackers seeking to collect information. CISA’s program will reach out to state election officials to prepare for such a ransomware scenario. It will provide educational material, remote computer penetration testing, and vulnerability scans as well as a list of recommendations on how to prevent and recover from ransomware.

Related: BoingBoing, CNN.com, EJ Insight, Voice of AmericaEngadget, CNBC Technology

Tweets:@anobleDC @ericgeller @keithchu


August 2, 2019
Joel Schechtman, Christopher Bing / Reuters

Joel Schechtman, Christopher Bing / Reuters  
Google Follows Mozilla in Branding Security Firm DarkMatter’s Sites Unsafe Due to Reported Ties to State Hacking Operations

Google said last week on a public discussion board that its Chrome and Android browsers would mark as unsafe all websites that had been certified by the UAE security firm DarkMatter following a Reuters report that tied DarkMatter to state hacking operations. Google follows Firefox browser in making the same decision. DarkMatter has denied being tied to offensive operations and has appealed Mozilla’s decision, which they said was based on “discriminatory practices,” and an “undisclosed conflict of interest.”

June 26, 2019
JACK STUBBS, JOSEPH MENN and CHRISTOPHER BING / Reuters

JACK STUBBS, JOSEPH MENN and CHRISTOPHER BING / Reuters  
Years-Long ‘Cloud Hopper’ Hacking Campaign Tied to Chinese Government Hit Eight of World’s Largest Technology Service Providers, Attacks Emanated to Waves of Clients

Eight of the world’s biggest technology service providers were hacked by teams of spies connected to the Chinese Ministry of State Security in an elaborate and years-long campaign called Cloud Hopper, a Reuters investigation discovered. Cloud Hopper was the subject of a U.S. indictment in December that accused two Chinese nationals of identity theft and fraud. At that time, prosecutors described an elaborate operation that victimized multiple Western companies but stopped short of naming them, although Reuters was able to identify two of them, Hewlett Packard Enterprise and IBM. The remaining six companies are Fujitsu, Tata Consultancy Services, NTT Data, Dimension Data, Computer Sciences Corporation and DXC Technology. Waves of clients of these eight companies were also victims, including Ericsson, Sabre, and shipbuilding company Huntington Ingalls Industries, although it is impossible to say how many clients of the service providers were compromised.

Related: New York Post, CBC, Kyiv Post, GlobalNews.ca, Slashdot, IT Pro, CRN

Tweets:@georgevhulme @Bing_Chris


June 27, 2019
Christopher Bing, Jack Stubbs, Joseph Menn / Reuters

Christopher Bing, Jack Stubbs, Joseph Menn / Reuters  
Hackers From Western Spy Agencies Broke Into Russia’s Yandex to Deploy Rare Regin Malware to Spy on Developers, Sources

Hackers working for Western intelligence agencies broke into Russian Internet search company Yandex, known as “Russia’s Google,” in late 2018 deploying a rare type of malware called Regin in an attempt to spy on user accounts in the company’s research and development unit, four people with knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Regin has been known to be used by intelligence agencies in the Five Eye countries, which is composed of the United States, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. The sources said the hackers appeared to be searching for technical information that could explain how Yandex authenticates user accounts, which could help spy agencies impersonate a Yandex user and access their private messages. Yandex spokesman Ilya Grabovsky acknowledged the attack but said it had been neutralized at an early stage and caused no damage.

Related: CNBC Technology, Slashdot, CNET News, Techradar, The Register – Security, ARN, Security – Computing, Deccan Chronicle

Tweets:@josephmenn


April 16, 2019
Christopher Bing, Jack Stubbs / Reuters

Christopher Bing, Jack Stubbs / Reuters  
U.S. Reportedly Plans to Pitch Allies on ‘Intellectual Framework’ to Effectively Bar Huawei, Chinese Vendors From 5G Networks

The U.S. will push its allies at a meeting in Prague next month to adopt shared security and policy measures that will make it more difficult for China’s Huawei to dominate 5G telecommunications networks, according to sources familiar with the matter and documents seen by Reuters. The meeting from May 2 -3 will be attended by officials from 30 countries to agree on security principles for next-generation telecoms network. Against the backdrop of a strong campaign by the U.S. against Huawei due to fear of spying by the Chinese government, the U.S. reportedly plans to adopt a softer approach against the telecom tech giant while in Prague, with U.S. officials hoping to provide the “intellectual framework” needed for other countries to effectively bar Chinese vendors.

April 1, 2019
JOEL SCHECTMAN and CHRISTOPHER BING / Reuters

JOEL SCHECTMAN and CHRISTOPHER BING / Reuters  
Former U.S. Intel Community Hackers Helped UAE Spy on Al Jazeera, BBC Host, Other Prominent Media Figures During Tense Situation With Qatar

A group of American hackers who once worked for the U.S. intelligence community,  including at least nine former employees of the National Security Agency and the U.S. military, became operatives working on Project Raven, a secret Emirati intelligence program that spied on dissidents, militants and political opponents of the UAE monarchy. While working on Project Raven, they spied on a BBC host, the chairman of Al Jazeera and other prominent Arab media figures during a tense 2017 confrontation pitting the UAE and its allies against the Gulf state of Qatar. Amid a tense standoff between UAE and its allies and Qatar, the UAE camp demanded a series of actions, including shuttering the Qatar-funded Al Jazeera satellite television network, withdrawal of other Doha-supported media outlets and cracks downs on the Muslim Brotherhood. In June 2017, followed a blockade of Qatar, the Project Raven operatives launched operations to break into the Apple iPhones of at least 10 journalists and media executives they believed had connections to the Qatari government or the Muslim Brotherhood, according to documents and sources. The objectives of the hacks were to show that Qatar had influenced Al Jazeera’s and other media outlets’ content and uncover any ties between the prominent network and the Muslim Brotherhood.